Epidaurus

Correct Translation My Translation

And so having sailed the whole day, as it became evening, they arrived at Epidaurus, having suffered nothing bad. As they got out onto the land it seemed good to Dick to go to the sanctuary of Asclepius directly; for it was not very distant; the woman being sick in the stomach was so exhausted that she did not want to go today but she stayed in a certain inn near the shore. And they set out and soon having arrived they found the gates closed. And so Dick said, "The gates are closed. What is it necessary to do? Shall I strike the gates or should we go back to the harbor? For it is late." And Phil said, "But knock, o father, if it seems best. For perhaps someone will hear and will lead us to the holy man." And so Dick knocked and some attendant having come out soon he said, "You being who are you knocking on the gates at this time of day? For where have you come and wishing what are you here?" And Dick said, "I am Dick being an Athenian and I bring my son, in the hope that the god may be willing to heal his eyes. For he has become blind. Will you not lead us to your master?" Through the small shut gate their minds returned. Dick said, "Were many inns made at the gate? Which of two light gates in the all-desiring sea?" Phil says, "But light, o father, it seems. For someone who the chief is around the priestess." Dick who serving light left did much and said, "Who is it? Who cuts the door at this time of day? Who desires?" Sailor said "Is late, equal here. For I am seeking my lord and asking your lord to be willing."
The servant said, "it is late but nevertheless wait there. For I will go to seek the master and I will ask him if he wishes to receive you." And so they waited at the gates; and not much later the servant having come back said, "Come in! For the master will receive you." Having said this he lead them into the sacred precinct. Then they desired the child to be at the gate. By much later, the sailor said, "Come in! For you are seeking your master." On this side of yourself is a piece of land.
And so having passed through the gates they came into a great courtyard; there a certain old man sat down near the temple, who seeing them approaching said, "Welcome, friends. Wishing what have you come?" And so Dick explained everything and the priest having looked kindly at the child said, "But tell me, o child, will you entrust yourself to Asclepius? Do you trust this, that the god will be able to help you?" Phil said, "Yes indeed, for everything is possible for gods; and I will entrust myself to him." The old man said, "Good child, now go away to the inn, and tomorrow the attendant will come to you to lead the child to me." And so leaving both the father and the child remained in the inn for the night. Having passed through the gate into the big courtyard; there they sat down near the holy man who was old, who looked at them approaching said, "Welcome! O friends! What wish is it?" Dick taught everywhere, to the holy child's kind eye he said, "This part, o child. Are you willing to pray to Asclepius? Put the faith in prayer, the gods rule and help?" Phil said "Very much. For everywhere the god is strong; god trusts and blinds me as I grow up." Old man says, "Well said, o child. Go away and down to the servant man who is yours to domesticate a child to me." The immense father and child returned quickly to the ship.
On the next day when it first became day having come forward the servant led Phil to the priest. Having received the child kindly he said, "Come indeed, o child. Now it is necessary to prepare yourself; for it is necessary to have holy thoughts and to be pure in your soul. Cheer up." Thus having spoken he led the child to the temple. And there Phil first purified himself then he waited the whole day in the temple. Thinking holy thoughts and praying to the god to appear in his sleep. When the late night first gave birth to daylight, the additional servant and Phil led to the strong. The child said to a convenient cistern, "Oh yes, o father. When is it necessary to prepare? For to have holy thoughts and clean with respect to the soul. But plan well. For most benevolent Asclepius, the god and pure essence of the soul, always gracious us he. Cheer up you." Thus the child is holy. The formerly purified Phil went out by himself, thereupon all the days in the temple were steady, I think the divine law and the prayers to god in the sleep manifest himself.
Finally when it became evening the priest having come back said, "Come o child, for everything is ready. Follow me." Having led the child out of the temple toward the altar he ordered him to make a libation according to custom. Having taken the cup in his hands he poured the libation and raising his hands to the heavens said, "Asclepius, savior, most benevolent of the gods, hear me praying, who thinking holy thoughts and being pure in the soul I am suppliant. Be gracious to me having become blind and, if it seems good to you, heal my eyes." The priest having led the child into the holy place ordered him to sleep lying on the floor. And so Phil laid down but was not able to sleep for much time; for being alone in the holy place he was very afraid; for it was night and there was darkness and silence everywhere, except occasionally he heard the snakes of the temple hissing gently. When the end grew into evening, the priest said, "Go now, o child. For everything is at hand. Part of a tale." The child went out of the temple to the altar, as he was commanded to drink the offering to produce a custom. The cup in his hands lifted a covenant poem and raising to he heavens he said, "Asclepius, savior, philanthropic god, hear me pray for my sacred sight and pure soul for I am suppliant. Gracious he said I who has become blind, it seems, speech." There the priest and child in the holy place laid down to sleep. Phil laid down but many times was not able to sleep. For alone in the holy place he was much afraid; for night and everywhere darkness and silence except the occasional hissing snake gently in the temple.

Copyright (c) 1996, 2000 by Ken Gagne. All rights reserved. Not to be distributed without permission.